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Bay of Quinte; Start of the Trent-Severn Waterway

Posted by on June 10, 2013

After a few days in Kingston to provision and finish the remaining maintenance work on His Idea, we were excited and ready to finally cast off for the second leg of our Great Loop adventure.

The first days were spent cruising about 70 miles through the protected waters of the Bay of Quinte, with a stop in Belleville to explore and visit with friends Bill and Carole Lowther. Also owners of a PDQ 34 (Tiger), they had originally planned to join us for our cruise this year, however other priorities got in the way. We’re hoping they’ll be able to join us in Florida next spring for a planned trip to the Bahamas. Thanks for all the fun and hospitality Bill and Carole!

Near the western end of the Bay of Quinte, Trenton marks the beginning of the Trent-Severn Waterway, which stretches across the upper portion of the Niagara Peninsula from Lake Ontario to Lake Huron. FoIt is 240 miles long, involves numerous lakes and rivers, and raises vessels about 180 metres from Lake Ontario to it’s summit at Lake Balsam. Like the Rideau Canal (see Exploring Canada’s Capital and the Rideau Canal – 2012/09/02), the TSW is operated by Parks Canada. It’s history is quite different, however, in that it’s development was driven by commercial (rather than military) needs. As such it was developed in sections over more than 80 years, starting in the 1830’s. The final piece to finish the entire route was not completed until the 1920’s. For a map and other resource information, go to http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/on/trentsevern/visit/visit8.aspx

We have not yet gone far along the Waterway, but have had much to experience – hot sunny days; wet cool nights; marshes and wildlife; waterfalls, dams and powerhouses; rural farmland and quaint small towns (with much history); and of course, locks, locks, locks. A few of our experiences are captured in the following pictures…..

Getting ready for departure - June 3

Getting ready for departure – Monday, June 3rd.

Farewell Kingston.....

Farewell Kingston…..
Our anchorage at Prinyer Cove; observe the Captain trying to recover the latest item to blow overboard - the adventure begins!

Our anchorage at Prinyer Cove, Bay of Quinte; observe the Captain trying to recover the latest item to blow overboard – the adventure begins!

Belleville Municipal Hall, a great example of late 19th century architecrue that reflected the prosperity and confidence of the times; also, it was designed by local architect John Evans (or so says the heritage plaque).

Belleville Municipal Hall, a great example of the late 19th century architecture that reflected the prosperity and confidence of the times; also, it was designed by local architect John Evans (or so says the heritage plaque).

Entrance to the Trent-Severn Waterway, in Trenton - only 240 miles and 45 locks to go.

Entrance to the Trent-Severn Waterway, in Trenton – only 240 miles and 45 locks to go.

Most of the locks have picturesque facilities for overnighting, but some are much wetter than others (note the Captain dumping accumulated rainfall from aft cockpit cover).

Most of the locks have picturesque facilities for overnighting; unfortunately some are much wetter than others (note the Captain dumping water from aft  cover).

Our peaceful anchoare at the 'Blue Hole'.

Our peaceful anchorage at the ‘Blue Hole’.

Turtles are quite abundant in the marshy areas of the TS; we discovered this one laying her eggs along the pathway between two of the locks.

Turtles are quite abundant in the marshy areas of the TSW; we discovered this one laying her eggs along the pathway between two of the locks.

Ranney Falls flight lock (#11/12) our largest so far, is located just before Campbellford (pop 7800), where we spent 3 days  moored at the town dock, and did plenty of exploring.

Ranney Falls flight lock (#11/12), our largest so far, is located just before Campbellford (pop. 7800), where we spent 3 days moored at the town dock, and did plenty of exploring.

After the storm - an evening scene from our mooring in Campbellford.

After the storm – an evening scene from our mooring in Campbellford.

Note the giant 'toonie' to the right of His Idea; a local artist designed this modern Canadian icon.

Note the giant ‘toonie’ to the right of His Idea; a local artist was the designer this modern Canadian icon.

As Ria has just applied for  her CPP, we though it appropriate to include this picture (we noticed may seniors in Campbellford).

As Ria has just applied for her CPP, we thought  it appropriate to include her testing the local ‘seniors crossing’.

Ranney Falls, from the suspension bridge......

Ranney Falls, from the Ranney Gorge Suspension Bridge.

The Admiral and the Captain clowning around.

The Admiral and the Captain clowning around.

One of our cycle trips, on a beautiful, warm Sunday, was to the Chuch Key micro brewery, located in an old church (circa 1878) at Petherick Corners.....

One of our cycle trips, on a beautiful, warm Sunday, was to the Church Key micro brewery, located in an old church (circa 1878) at Petherick Corners…..

.....where we met 'Churchkey', the brewery's recently adopted and very friendly mascot.

…..where we were greeted by ‘Churchkey’, the brewery’s recently adopted and very friendly mascot.

The next post will be coming from somewhere further along the Trent-Severn. likely in a week or two.

One Response to Bay of Quinte; Start of the Trent-Severn Waterway

  1. Doug

    I can’t believe I have waited six days past the writing of this to read the blog and view the pictures. Of course I have been busy…ha! Happy Father’s Day, John! Hmmm, architecture, another hidden talent?

    Cheers,

    Doug

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